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HIV, Hepatitis B and C and Tuberculosis (TB)

HIV

What is HIV?

  • HIV is a virus that spreads from one person to another through some bodily fluids such as semen and breast milk.  
  • The virus attacks the body’s immune system and over time this damage to the immune system makes it harder and harder for the body to fight off infections and some other diseases.  
  • If you do not get treated you will get very sick and even die and you may pass on the virus to other people, particularly if you have sex without a condom.  
  • No cure exists for HIV. But with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled.

HIV is a global problem but worse in sub-Saharan Africa.  If you are a member of the black African community living in Coventry you can talk to The Highlife Centre on 024 7655 0057 or email info@thehighlife.org about:

  • What is HIV?
  • Who is at risk?
  • How is it passed on?
  • How to protect yourself from HIV
  • What are the symptoms of HIV (the things that tell you that you may be ill)?
  • How HIV affects your health
  • The importance of early testing 
  • Where to get tested and the different ways you can get tested
  • What to expect in terms of testing and treatment services

Are you a member of a community or religious group that works with the Black African population?  Do you want to support your community to reduce the number of people with HIV?

If yes, please telephone Celestine Celest to find out about the community training available on 07517 22791 or email vkamara@celestinecelest.org or through the website www.celestinecelest.org 

  • Protect yourself from HIV and use a condom
  • HIV testing and treatment is free for everyone living in Coventry
  • Services will not share what you tell them with anyone unless they feel that you or somebody else is in danger.

The only way to know whether you have HIV is to get tested. Go to www.test.hiv to order a free test or  go to the following pharmacies to get a free HIV test that will indicate whether you have HIV in 60 seconds:

  • Boots, 585, Stoney Stanton Road, Coventry CV6 5ED
  • Boots, 10 Quorn Way, Ernesford Grange, Coventry CV3 2JU
  • Boots, 49 The Precinct, Coventry City Centre, CV1 1DS
  • Boots, Unit 7, Central Six Retail Park, Coventry, CV3 6TA
  • Boots, 3-5 Cross Cheaping, Coventry City Centre, CV1 1HF
  • Superdrug, 30-31 Hertford Street, Coventry City Centre, CV1 1LF
  • Superdrug, 21-23 Market Way, Coventry City Centre, CV1 1DL
  • Vantage Chemist, 130 Far Gosford Street, Lower Stoke, Coventry, CV1 5EA
  • M Hussain Chemists Ltd, 1A Harnall Lane East, Coventry CV1 5AE

Hepatitis B and C

Hepatitis B and C are viruses that cause inflammation of the liver which may lead to liver scarring and cancer. Your liver is very tough and able to function even when it is damaged. Because of this, many people don’t know they have Hepatitis and may pass on the virus to other people.   Hepatitis B can be passed on through bodily fluids and blood and Hepatitis C can be passed on through blood. 

Hepatitis is a global problem and worse in Asia, the Middle East and Africa, so the risk of disease is higher in people born there or in people who live or have lived with people with Hepatitis. 

If you are a member of one of these populations you can talk to someone to find out more about Hepatitis B and C such as:

  • What is Hepatitis B and C?
  • Who is at risk of being infected with Hepatitis B and C?
  • How is Hepatitis B and C passed on?
  • What are the symptoms of Hepatitis B and C (the things that tell you that you may be ill)?
  • How Hepatitis B and C affects your health
  • The importance of testing
  • Where to get tested
  • What to expect in terms of testing and treatment services.  

If you are a member of the Asian population or are from Afghanistan, Eritrea or Somalia you can phone St Peter’s Centre on 024 7663 2877 or Foleshill Women's Training on 024 7663 7693 or through the website www.fwt.org.uk
If you are a member of the Black African population you can phone The Highlife Centre on on 024 7655 0057 or email info@thehighlife.org
Services will not share what you tell them with anyone unless they feel that you or somebody else is in danger.
Remember the only way to know if you have Hepatitis B or C is to get tested, testing and treatment is free for everyone living in Coventry.

Tuberculosis (TB)

“TB” is short for tuberculosis. TB is spread from person to person through the air.  If you are infected with TB you can pass it on to people you spend a lot time with such as your family by coughing and sneezing.  TB can affect any part of the body, but only TB of the lungs or throat are infectious. TB will make you unwell and if you do not get treated, it can be fatal. 
TB is a serious illness, but with treatment it can be cured. Most people need a course of antibiotics, usually for six months, and you must finish the course of treatment.
TB is a global problem and worse in Asia and Africa so the risk of disease is higher in people born there or in people who live or have lived with people with TB.  If you are a member of one of these populations you can talk to someone to find out more about TB such as:

  • What is TB?
  • Who is at risk?
  • How is TB passed on?
  • What are the symptoms of TB (the things that tell you that you may be ill)?
  • How TB affects your health
  • The importance of seeing your GP if you have symptoms
  • What to expect in terms of services.  

If you are a member of the Black African population please telephone on 024 7655 0057 or email info@thehighlife.org to talk to the Highlife Centre.  
If you are a member of the Asian population or are from Afghanistan, Eritrea or Somalia you can phone St Peter’s Centre on 024 7663 2877 or Foleshill Women's Training on 024 7663 7693 or email Noreen.Bukhari@fwt.org.uk or through the website www.fwt.org.uk
Services will not share what you tell them with anyone unless they feel that you or somebody else is in danger.
Remember the only way to get rid of TB is to make sure you see your GP if you have symptoms.  If you want to get rid of TB you must get treated and complete your treatment.

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