Social communication and ASD (5-16 years old)

Social Communication and ASD support for children from 5-16 years old.

Find out about:

View full details of ADHD - The questions that parents want to ask

About

'ADHD: The questions parents want to ask' is a video from BBC Stories. This video has information about ADHD and how it feels for someone with ADHD. 

 

close result
View full details of Amazing Things Happen - an animated video about autism

About

Amazing Things Happen is an introduction to autism that aims to raise awareness among young non-autistic audiences, to stimulate understanding and acceptance in future generations. It is intended to be viewed, discussed and shared widely by anyone but especially teachers and parents.

Amazing Things Happen is the creation of independent animation director Alex Amelines. 

close result
View full details of Complex Communication Team - Autism and Social Communication 

About

The Complex Communication Team are a team of experienced teachers who specialise in supporting primary and secondary age children and young people who are diagnosed with autism, or who present with social communication difficulties. They consider the child or young person’s needs and provide supportive and enabling strategies for the individual, their school and their parents/carers.

How do they work?

They are a traded service, that means that their services are bought in by schools. They work closely with schools to provide support for individuals, groups and school staff, and we also deliver staff training on a bespoke basis.

Schools request work at termly planning meetings. Parents must give their consent and their views are requested before work begins.

When they meet pupils, they talk to them about the things they are good at, the areas they find tricky and how they would like things to improve.

Information from parents, pupil and school is used alongside their own professional judgement to determine priorities and next steps. Recommendations for supportive strategies and interventions which will have a positive impact on pupil progress are provided to school. Progress can be reviewed by the team or by school.

How can they help you?

The Complex Communication Team can offer a range of services including:

  • Observation in class (advice, strategies, resources)
  • One to one interventions with CYP (including ‘Pupil Voice’)
  • Group interventions
  • Meetings with parents (both individual and groups)
  • Caseload surgeries
  • Peer awareness sessions
  • Assemblies around Autism Awareness
  • Learning walks/Environmental audits
  • Informal assessments of individual children
  • Attendance at My Support Plan meetings and Annual Reviews
  • Formal reports 
  • Training packages

Specific one to one interventions that they offer include:

  • Emotional regulation
  • Managing anxiety
  • Self-awareness
  • Diagnosis awareness
  • Friendship skills
  • Self-esteem/self-confidence
  • Inappropriate sexualised behaviour
  • Intensive interaction
  • Understanding puberty

Specific group interventions that they offer include:

  • Social skills
  • Transition groups
  • Lego Therapy
  • Relaxation groups
  • Yoga for children
  • Others at the request of the school

How to contact them

Support can be accessed through your child or young person's school.

For more information, please see the Complex Communication Team's website

 

close result
View full details of Dimensions Tool - Find Out What Help is Available

About

The Dimensions tool helps young people, parents, carers, referrers and professionals find out what could be offered to help with their particular difficulties, using a shared database of local interventions.

The database includes interventions across the services for young people, inside and outside the NHS, including those available through charities, support groups and the local authority.

This demonstrates the different kinds of services and support for well-being, with specialist mental health services being needed for only the more severe difficulties.

The Dimensions app has been developed with carers, service users, referrers, local services, clinicians and the CWPT Trust. 

 

close result
View full details of Educational Psychology Service - Introduction

About

The Educational Psychology Service (EPS) provides a specialised response to children/young people whose progress in educational settings is presenting serious concerns to their parents/carers and to staff who teach that child/young person. Support from an Educational Psychologist (EP) needs to be requested in most cases by:

  • a school/academy, 
  • the local authority, or
  • in the case of early years children (i.e. before the age that statutory schooling begins), the Health Authority, Early Years settings, other Local Area support services or parents who are due to move to live in this Local Area. 

The EPS is based at Limbrick Wood Centre, Thomas Naul Croft, Tile Hill, Coventry, CV4 9QX.

Requests from schools

At the beginning of each financial year, schools ask for an agreed total number of hours from the EPS. In exceptional circumstances, schools may request additional hours from the EPS during the course of that financial year. At the beginning of each school term, the EP and Special Educational Needs Coordinator (SENCo) meet to agree the work that the EP will complete over the course of the term. 

How to access educational psychology in Coventry

Coventry City Council’s Educational Psychology team (EPS) provides services for children and young people with significant or complex special educational needs. In most cases, support from an Educational Psychologist (EP) needs to be requested by:

  • the local authority, 
  • a school or academy that has purchased support from the team, or
  • in the case of early years children (i.e. before the age that statutory schooling begins), the Health Authority, Early Years settings, other Local Area support services or parents who are due to move to live in this Local Area. 

Requests from the Local Authority

The Local Authority commissions the EP team to complete a range of work on its behalf. This includes EHC Needs Assessments, work with Early Years children, work in special schools and work with children and young people attending out-of-city provision. Support is usually requested by the Statutory Assessment and Review Service (SARS). 

Requests from parents, carers and young people

If parents or carers have concerns that their child has special educational needs and wish for the involvement of an EP, they should raise their concerns with the setting’s Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCo) in the first instance. 
If a parent or carer contacts the EP team directly to request involvement, the EP may agree to discuss the parent or carer’s concerns at the next Planning Meeting. A representative from the school will then inform the parent or carer of any actions that are agreed.  

Gaining parental consent

Parental consent is necessary for an EP to start work with a young person and to process their personal information. This is usually gained from parents, carers or the young person themselves by the SENCo of the setting they attend.

Children receiving education at home

Requests for EP support for children who are electively home educated, should be addressed to the SARS team in the first instance.

For more information, please visit the Educational Psychology website.

The Revised Neurodevelopmental Pathway

Coventry’s Revised Neurodevelopmental Pathway has been created to improve the support for parents and carers of children and young people with social communication difficulties that may be linked to autism.

Health and education professionals have gathered the views of parents/carers, schools and GPs  in order to make the pathway more user-friendly and supportive. They want families and professionals to be able to work together more easily.

For more information please visit The Neurodevelopmental Pathway Leaflets and Forms page 

Here you can find more information about the Neurodevelopmental pathway in Coventry and how to get the kind of help and support that is best for you. 

Telephone

024 7678 8400

close result
View full details of Mental Health Support for Children - CAMHS Specialist Learning Disability Team

About

Who are we?

The LD - CAMHS are a multi-disciplinary team who work with children who have a moderate to severe learning disability and additional significant mental health/behavioural problems. We endeavour to work closely with young people, their families and other professionals who are also supporting the young person. We accept referrals for children and young people aged 0-18 years old that have an Education Health and Care Plan (EHCP ). Our service only supports children with Section G of their EHCP.

If children are referred over the age of 16 years, our team will work with adult services and transition forums as needed. 

Who is in the team?

A young person with Special Education Needs and Disabilities may need to be supported by a number of different professionals. We have the following professionals on our team:

  • Consultant psychiatrist
  • Clinical psychologist
  • Specialist Learning Disability Nurses
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Speech and Language therapist

What do we offer?

A young person and their family are offered an initial assessment which will determine if we are the right service to help with their difficulties. This will be carried out by one of the clinical professionals in the team.

Initial assessments are often held in clinic but can be arranged to be carried out at home or school. It is essential that the young person and the parents/carers attend the assessment.

If a young person qualifies for our service a specialist assessment will be carried out. This may involve:

  • Formal mental health, behavioural, psychological, sensory and/or communication assessments
  • Direct interviews and observations of the young person, parents/carers/schools/respite carers
  • Indirect interviews / gathering historical information
  • Group intervention

Intervention will depend on the outcome of the specialist assessments and may include:

  •  Working with the people around the young person, at home, in school and respite services
  • Direct work with the young person

Sometimes it is necessary for a young person to be under the care of our Consultant Psychiatrist, this would be for:

  • Medication
  • Diagnosis

Who can refer?

Referrals are accepted from:

Any professional that is involved with a child or young person as part of a local tiered response. This could be:

  • Social Workers
  • Teachers
  • Health Visitors
  • Paediatricians
  • School Nurses
  • Primary Mental Health Workers
  • Doctors
  • Educational Psychologists.

When a referral comes through a school, the Head Teacher should be notified. 

 

Referral Guidelines LD - CAMHS

https://www.cwrise.com/what-is-camhs

Telephone

 0300 200 2021

close result
View full details of Mental Health Support for Children - RISE and the Neurodevelopmental Service

About

What is Rise?

RISE is Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership Trust's and the NHS' emotional well-being and mental health services for children and young people in Coventry and Warwickshire. In 2017 they put a short list of names out to vote and 'Rise' was the chosen name for the services.

Rise seeks to work more closely with schools, voluntary community services, Social Care and Primary Care (such as GP practices) to increase support for the children and young people who need it. We have put in place and continue to develop programmes and training packages that can be accessed by our partners.

The key aims of Rise are:

  • Increased emphasis on prevention and early intervention for mental health issues
  • Focus on building resilience 
  • to be integrated in our working, especially with schools
  • to work with a child or young person's family and extended network
  • to support in partnership with the system complex and vulnerable children
  • to help children and young people bounce back when things get tough
  • to make getting help really easy - our vision is : ‘No door being the wrong door’
  • to support children and young people aged 0-25 in a way that matters to them
  • to support the whole family – not just the child
  • to reach out to those who need us most

For more information, please see the Rise website

Neurodevelopmental Service

What is The Neurodevelopmental Service?

The Neurodevelopmental Service is a highly skilled multidisciplinary team within the wider Rise service who provide assessment and diagnosis of neurodevelopmental disorders including ASD, ADHD, Tourette’s and Dyspraxia (as a co-occurring disorder).

The Neurodevelopmental service was created in order to meet the needs of children and young people with these disorders, understanding that they may not have a Learning Disability and/or a Mental Health concern.  It also appreciates that these individuals have needs which should be supported in a holistic way, including social, emotional and physical well- being. The vision of the service is to improve the child/young person’s life chances by reducing/preventing co morbid acute mental health problems such as anxiety, depression and self-harm and reducing/preventing family, social and educational breakdown. The Neurodevelopmental Service also strives to support the child/young person in reaching their individual potential.

The aims:

  • To reduce the occurrence of mental health concerns requiring specialist mental health services for children and young people with neurodevelopmental disorders
  • To provide streamlined assessment  and diagnosis process for children and young people with co- occurring neurodevelopmental disorders
  • To provide specialist pre and  post assessment/diagnostic support to families and carers of children and young people with neurodevelopmental disorders
  • To provide group interventions to support secondary symptoms relating to neurodevelopmental disorders such as managing anxiety,  anger and other emotions, communication difficulties, and sensory differences.
  • To provide specialist psychological/ therapeutic interventions for children with complex needs relating to their neurodevelopmental disorders that cannot be successfully supported in or are not appropriate for mental health services.
  • To work with other services to ensure access to support for children and young people with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and their families is core to what they provide.

For more information, please see the Neurodevelopmental Service website.

For information about referring in to the service, please see How to refer to the Neurodevelopment Service

close result
View full details of National Organisation - Autism Links

About

Autism Links is dedicated to making helpful and sometimes vital links to charities, support groups and specialist service providers that are all ready to share advice and experience whenever you need it.

The Autism Links website covers who to talk to, where to go and contains lots of helpful advice all in one place.

close result
View full details of National Organisation - I CAN

About

I CAN is the children's communication charity.

They are experts in helping children develop the speech, language and communication skills they need to thrive in a 21st century world.

Their vision is a world where all children have the communication skills they need to fulfil their potential.

Their mission is to ensure that all children with communication difficulties are identified and supported so that they’re not left out or left behind.

For more information, visit the I CAN website 

close result
View full details of National Organisation - National Autistic Society (NAS)

About

The National Autistic Society (NAS) is the leading UK charity for people with autism (including Asperger syndrome) and their families.

Their goal is to help transform lives, change attitudes and create a society that works for autistic people.

They provide information, support and pioneering services, and campaign for a better world for people with autism.

The NAS also has information about the National Autism Act 2009.

The National Autism Act 2009 was the result of two years of active campaigning. 

It is the only act dedicated to improving support and services for one disability.

For more information, please visit the NAS guides to the National Autism Act and the NAS website 

 

close result
View full details of National Organisation - The Communication Trust

About

The Communication Trust is a coalition of over 50 not-for-profit organisations.

They work together to support people who work with children and young people in England to support their speech, language and communication.

For more information, please see The Communication Trust website

 

close result
View full details of National Organisation - The Curly Hair Project

About

The Curly Hair Project (CHP) is an award-winning social enterprise founded by autistic author and entrepreneur Alis Rowe.

Their resources are used by individuals, families and professionals all over the world.

Things that make their work different: 

  • It is based on real life, personal experiences
  • They teach people how to really apply the theory we teach about autism
  • They have a very ‘inclusive’ approach – supporting all people in developing communication and relationships
  • They don’t expect the rest of the world to change to fit in with the autistic person – they want everyone to adapt and work together!
  • They aim to help autistic people learn to understand themselves and their needs and ultimately be able to self-manage
  • Their work is all about acceptance, understanding and empathy for different world experiences
  • They can offer differentiated learning because Alis is on the autistic spectrum herself

For more information, see The Curly Hair Project Website or the Curly Hair Project Facebook Page

close result
View full details of Neurodevelopmental Pathway - Educational Psychology Service

About

The Revised Neurodevelopmental Pathway

Coventry’s Revised Neurodevelopmental Pathway has been created to improve the support for parents and carers of children and young people with social communication difficulties that may be linked to autism.

Health and education professionals have gathered the views of parents/carers, schools and GPs in order to make the pathway more user-friendly and supportive. They want families and professionals to be able to work together more easily.

For more information please visit The Neurodevelopmental Pathway Leaflets and Forms page

Here you can find more information about the Neurodevelopmental Pathway in Coventry and how to get the kind of help and support that is best for you.

Telephone

024 7678 8400

close result
View full details of Speech and Language Therapy - Adults

About

Speech and Language Therapy - Adults

The role of the Speech and Language Therapy - Adults Team is to assess and treat adults who have swallowing, speech, language, voice, stammering and/or communication problems. People may find they have one or more of these difficulties.

This is a self-referring service.

There can be many reasons why people can have difficulties with speech, language and/or swallowing.

For example, someone has had a stroke (CVA), suffered from a head injury, or if they have a degenerative neurological condition such as Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Multiple Sclerosis, Huntingdon's Disease or Motor Neurone Disease.

We work with adults who may have one or more of the following difficulties and who have a Coventry GP:

  • Producing speech and using speech
  • Stammering/stuttering
  • Understanding language - spoken and/or written down by other people
  • Using language e.g. finding the right words to say, or finding the right words to write down
  • Voice problems e.g. a hoarse or croaky voice
  • Swallowing food and/or drinks and/or medications

For more information, please visit the Speech and Language Therapy - Adults website.

Someone with a learning disability who has swallowing problems should refer to our Community Learning Disability Team.

close result
View full details of Speech and Language Therapy - Children and Young People

About

What is Speech and Language Therapy? 

Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) provides assessment, advice and intervention for children who have difficulties communicating (understanding and/or expressing their needs) or have eating, drinking and swallowing difficulties.

How do I know if my child has a difficulty with speech, language or communication? 

Children typically develop certain skills at certain age ranges. However it is worth noting that all children are different and that there is a very wide range of ‘typical’ development.  You may be concerned if your child has:

  • unclear speech
  • a stutter/stammer
  • difficulty understanding you
  • difficulty using the right words or making sentences
  • an unusual voice quality
  • difficulty talking in certain social situations or environments

What can I do if my child has a difficulty with speech, language or communication (SLC)?

There are lots you can do to encourage development of SLC.  Have a look at the Coventry Children's SLT website for some great ideas.

If you are concerned that your child has a difficulty, in the first instance you should speak to your health visitor, school or nursery staff. They will have had specific training in order to offer advice and some intervention.

When may a child need to see a speech and language therapist? 

Many children will experience difficulties with their communication or eating and drinking at some point in their life. Most of these children will make progress naturally, others may benefit from advice and support from their health visitor/ nursery/ school.  Some children however will need some specific support from the Speech and Language Therapy service.

We offer appropriate levels of support to meet a child’s needs in the following ways:

The universal offer

Communication development is best supported through a child’s everyday routine and experiences and by those who spend the most time with the children (ie parents/ education staff).

This way they get more opportunities to practice the skills they will need to use in the environments that they use those skills. 

Children who attend a special school often have a range of more complex difficulties, which may include communication.

The Speech and Language Therapy team aim for these children and young people to have access to a total communication environment, where spoken language is supported by objects, signs and symbols if appropriate. 

The specialist offer

Some children need input from the Speech and Language Therapy team for a period of time following on from the universal support. If this is the case, a child can be referred directly to the Speech and Language Team. The person making the referral will be asked to provide details on what universal support has already been offered to the child . This helps us to understand what support has been put in place already.  

Please use the referral form to refer a child into this service. Anyone who knows or works with a child/young person can refer to our service (with parental consent), the referral system is open to all including parents/carers.

All referrals are looked at by a qualified speech and language therapist to ensure the most appropriate management is offered to the child. All children/young people accepted to the service will be offered an assessment with a speech & language therapist. If we need to carry out an initial assessment we will contact the family/carer directly to arrange this. The initial assessment may be offered in a variety of settings (school/ nursery/ home/ clinic).

Following the initial assessment the therapist will discuss the findings and next steps with you. On some occasions, the therapist may need time to score the assessments before contacting you to discuss the outcome. The Speech and Language Team provide evidence-based intervention and support for a number of specific difficulties.

All interventions continue to require support from parents, carers and education colleagues to be successful and the Speech and Language Team work in partnership to achieve this. Following assessment, advice will be given and children/young people may receive intervention as appropriate. To achieve the best outcomes, the Speech and Language Team work together with:

  • The child/ young person
  • Their family/carers
  • Their nursery or school
  • Other important people in a child/young person's life.

Intervention can be:

  • 'Indirect' where advice and activities are suggested. These are carried out by families/carers and other professionals such as school staff.
  • 'Direct' where the child is seen more regularly by a speech & language therapist or speech & language therapy assistant with follow up work to be carried out at home/ school/ nursery.

Parents/carers are invited to all assessment and intervention sessions. The speech and language therapists set their speech and language therapy targets along with the child / young person and their families. 

Some children have very specific needs which require our input urgently. This includes children with swallowing difficulties or those who have recently had a major head injury or surgery, leading to sudden onset speech, language or communication difficulties. These children tend to be referred directly to us via their doctor. 

The service is based at City of Coventry Health Centre (4th floor) Stoney Stanton Road, Coventry CV1 4FS

close result
View full details of Support - Autism West Midlands

About

Autism West Midlands are the leading charity in the West Midlands for people on the autism spectrum.

They use their expertise to enrich the lives of autistic people and those who love and care for them. Their passionate, expert staff and volunteers work across all age groups and abilities, providing direct support.

They support autistic people to live as independently as possible, in residential care, or in their own or the family home

  • They provide activities and events and support for families, and an information helpline
  • They help autistic people to find and keep a job
  • They offer training for parents of children on the autism spectrum, and the professionals who help them ….and much more!

Vision

A world where autistic people are universally understood and accepted as equal citizens.

Mission

To provide specialist support and advice to autistic people of all ages and their families living in the West Midlands, enabling them to meet their full potential.

Fore more information please visit the Autism West Midlands website

close result

Didn't find what you were looking for? Search again, or add a group, activity or organisation to our listings.

Coventry SEND

Is there anything wrong with this page?